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Wire Mesh Manufacturers and Suppliers

IQS Directory provides a comprehensive list of wire mesh manufacturers and suppliers. Use our website to review and source top wire mesh manufacturers with roll over ads and detailed product descriptions. Find wire mesh companies that can design, engineer, and manufacture wire mesh to your companies specifications. Then contact the wire mesh companies through our quick and easy request for quote form. Website links, company profile, locations, phone, product videos and product information is provided for each company. Access customer reviews and keep up to date with product new articles. Whether you are looking for manufacturers of plastic coated wire mesh, steel wire mesh, PVC wire mesh, or customized wire mesh of every type, this is the resource for you.

  • Adamsville, TN

    Our wire mesh is among the best on the market today. We have been in the business of bringing excellent customer service since we opened our doors to the public. Our qualified and friendly staff is trained in working with you from the beginning of the design process until you have the finished product that you are fully satisfied with. We have made it our mission to turn first-time customers into life-long connections. Come and visit our website for more information or send us an email today!

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  • Wallingford, CT

    Dexmet is an experienced and innovative manufacturer of high precision wire mesh and perforated metal items. Our facilities are capable of accommodating all your custom design needs and our line of products includes expanded metals, expanded plastics, multipath resistors, load banks and other items that are used for fuel cells, decoration, battery electrodes, heating elements and more.

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  • Morrisville, PA

    Since 1976, Universal Wire Cloth Company has been a leader in the wire cloth industry. By being a family owned and operated business, we are able to provide our customers with personal care and the highest quality products from custom “in house” wire weaving to a inventory with a huge range of wire mesh specs and services including OEM replacements screens. Call us today for more information or visit our website to see all of our products and services.

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  • Clifton, NJ

    Newark Wire Cloth Company was established in 1911, and has grown to become a recognized leader in the wire cloth industry. Our wire mesh products are built to provide optimum filtering, sifting, and protection for your desired applications. We offer customization options for our products in order to make sure your exact needs are addressed. For a complete list of our products and services, call or visit our website.

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  • Tampa, FL

    McNichols Co. is an on-line supplier of industrial products. We stock both perforated metal and plastic products, bar gratings, wire cloth, wire cloth screens, wire mesh, grip struts, expanded metal, fiberglass gratings and floorings and more.

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  • Lancaster, PA

    Hoyt Wire Cloth is a family-owned business that has been serving a variety of markets for over 50 years. We have experience producing wire cloth for industries such as coal, landscaping, concrete, gravel & sand, and more. Our line of wire mesh products includes self-cleaning screens, perforated plate, screening accessories, and more. If you have a design in mind call us and will manufacture what you need. To get started with Hoyt, call us or visit our website.

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  • More Wire Mesh Companies

ARTICLES AND PRESS RELEASES

Leader in Wire Cloth Industry Since 1911: Newark Wire Cloth Company

Wire Mesh As a pacesetter in the wire cloth industry, Newark Wire Cloth Company, strives to provide helpful and timely service, supply the highest quality wire mesh, and produce top quality parts at competitive prices. We aim to be the standard of excellence in wire cloth products, providing a safe and rewarding livelihood for our co-workers. Our products come in many different forms, including, aerospace, pharmaceutical, food, chemical, automotive, medical, environmental, and many others Read More...... Read More

Showcase Your Processes with Decorative Accents

Wire mesh has a huge variety of uses in factories and industrial applications all over the world. The mesh is used for insulation, fire retardation, straining construction, filtering, draining, cleaning, and many other processes in factories. One slightly less used application for wire mesh is for decorative and aesthetic purposes. A mesh wire company manufactures a huge variety of mesh types, with different weaves, thicknesses, shapes, and materials. All of these specific types of mesh have their own uses and place in the world. Some companies also create mesh for... Read More

The Purpose of Industrial Strainers

When people commonly think of strainers, they most likely think of common household strainers. Household strainers are invaluable tools in the kitchen used for straining water and other liquids, removing lumps, and giving flour and other ingredients a light texture. The industrial world also uses wire strainers for similar uses, but an industrial wire strainer is usually bigger and sturdier than any household strainer. Many industries use strainers in everyday business to sift different sized material or to drain unwanted sludge from a liquid. Most industrial factories use a wire... Read More

Marketing Tips for Wire Mesh Companies

The industrial marketing techniques of today are vastly different from marketing techniques in the past. In the past, manufacturers mainly relied on word-of-mouth and proximity to factories and businesses in the area. Today's manufacturing marketing is cutthroat and challenging. Each manufacturing plant must establish a unique presence that will help retain current customers and bring new customers into the business. Wire mesh companies are part of an industry where marketing techniques have changed. The biggest change to the marketing world is how much an online presence can boost your overall... Read More

Wire Mesh and Textile Weaving: Same Process, Different Results

by Jenny Knodell, IQS Editor Wire mesh is a pretty useful household material not only does it help wash foods and drain pasta, it keeps pesky bugs out while allowing a cool summer breeze in. It functions decoratively inside cabinets and protects furniture and people from flying embers in a fireplace. It's found in all sorts of filtration systems, vents, sifters and screens to keep the air/water flowing and the dust and particles trapped. For a moment, think about a world without any wire mesh. Bugs flying freely indoors and... Read More

businessIndustry Information

Wire Mesh

Wire mesh, or wire cloth, is an industrial product made from interlocking metal wires that have been weaved, welded or sintered together. Industrial wire cloth has evenly spaced and uniform openings.

Applications

The purpose of wire mesh manufacturing is to create products that can be used for all kinds of applications. Most often, these applications are related to separating, filtering, screening, structuring and shielding.

Wire cloth also has applications in the watermarking of bills and notes, the shielding of micro and radio waves, plastic extrusion, optical lens manufacturing, transportation belt manufacturing, and the diffusion of light, heat and flames.

Wire mesh services are valued by a wide variety of industries, including: food and beverage processing, petrochemical processing, pharmaceutical manufacturing, screen printing, automotive manufacturing, pulp and paper, flooring, home appliance, HVAC, mining, battery manufacturing, and industrial manufacturing.



Assortment of Wire Mesh Products
Wire Mesh Filter Products
Wire Mesh
Assortment of Wire Mesh Products – Langley Wire Cloth Components, Inc.
Wire Mesh Filter Products – Langley Wire Cloth Components, Inc.
Wire Mesh – Dexmet Corporation
Wire Mesh Cylinder
Wire Mesh
Architectural Wire Mesh
Wire Mesh Cylinder – Dexmet Corporation
Wire Mesh – CPI Wire Cloth & Screens, Inc.
Architectural Wire Mesh – Universal Wire Cloth Company



Products Produced

Manufacturers weave and shape wire into many products. All final products start out as generic products, including: wire forms, woven wire mesh, square mesh, welded wire mesh (hardware cloth), fine wire cloth, strong wire cloth and diamond mesh.

These products serve as blank canvases, by which manufacturers make more specific products, such as: window screen, decorative mesh, flour sifters and cooking strainers, wire cloth filter products, wire strainers, animal cages, chicken wire, sieves and screens, catalytic converters, protection equipment and barriers, screen mesh cloth and floor grating.

History

The first noted use of wire cloth was recorded in ancient Egypt, when precious metals, such as gold and silver, were hand woven into cloth as jewelry for the wealthy.

For centuries, wire cloth was used for nothing other than jewelry in various forms. However, in the 5th century, people began using wire cloth for armor. The craftsmen of the century ingeniously fabricated metals, including iron, into chain mail, which acted as a protective shield for fighters and soldiers. The fluidity of chain mail gave soldiers flexibility, something metal body suits were lacking. Manufacturing and distribution was under the direct control of kingdoms, and many kingdoms regulated the sale and export, since in many battles chain mail was the difference between the victory and loss.

As chain mail was embraced all over the western world, the precursor of wire working and wire drawing industry was established. The industry evolved and artisans and metalworkers started to fabricate all sorts of wire form products, such as birdcages, mousetraps, windows, chains and hooks.

Large scale wire mesh product manufacturing did not begin until the advent of the Industrial Revolution. This time period saw the appearance of the first modern weaving looms, which were powered by steam. These looms automated wire weaving, allowing for quicker and higher volume product production. The industry was further buoyed by: the use of wire cloth reinforced sails in the maritime industry, flame-arresting wire cloth gauze and wire cloth gauge in mining, and fine wire mesh in the paper industry.

In the 20th century, wire mesh applications expanded again. At that time, manufacturers used an array of wire mesh products, like filters, for making military equipment like tanks, military vehicles and aircrafts. In WWI specifically, when chemical warfare was used extensively, wire cloth was used for making gas masks.

Today, wire mesh is used for even more, such as building and construction, food processing and decoration.

Materials Process

The most common metals and alloys used for making wire cloths are:

Low-Carbon Steel

    Low-carbon steel, also known as plain steel, is marginally resistant to corrosion and abrasion. Wire cloth made from it is considered low quality for application in a moist environment. However, low carbon steel has high impact resistance and tensile strength, which makes it suitable for most applications, including metal mesh and hardware cloth. Galvanized steel is even stronger.

High-Carbon Steel

    High-carbon steel is more naturally resistant to abrasion and corrosion. With this type of steel, galvanization is not necessary. High-carbon steel is used for making vibrating filter screens for sorting and sifting of abrasive materials, such as stone, gravel and coal.

Stainless Steel

    For the highest quality, manufacturers make products from stainless steel wire mesh, since stainless steel wire cloth is virtually resistant to a variety of corroding elements. If application demands, stainless steel can be preprocessed to be magnetized or unmagnetized. Moreover, metals like titanium, chromium, nickel, and molybdenum are added to stainless steel for custom-made mesh material, as these metals can change properties, such as heat and moisture resistance, shock absorbency, for a given need.

Copper

    When wire clothes need good heat and electrical conductivity, manufacturers use copper. Copper naturally has high conductivity and shows resistance to salty and briny environments, which makes it suitable for making wire cloth that will be used in a chemically corroding environment. However, copper is a soft metal and shows poor resistance towards abrasive materials and has poor tensile strength. To supplement the abrasion resistance, copper wire mesh is alloyed with zinc; however, the resulting copper mesh has low heat and electrical conductivity.

Aluminum

    When an application needs wire cloth to be light, aluminum is used. Since aluminum has natural anti-corrosion properties and high strength-to-weight ratios, aluminum is used for making wire cloth, which is used in marine environment. However, usually, alloys of aluminum, such as 5056, are utilized rather than a standard aluminum.

Nickel

    Pure nickel is rarely used for making wire screens or wire forms, since it shows low resistance to corrosion; a layer of oxide develops over the surface over time. Therefore, alloys like monel, hastelloy B, hastelloy C and Carpenter 20 CB-3 are preferred.

Process Details

Manufacturers create wire mesh products using two basic processes: weaving and welding. They can also knit wire, which is a process that works just as it sounds, or sinter it. Sintered wire mesh, although more costly than welded or woven wire mesh, has high structural stability and is excellent for the transportation of bulk goods and powders.

Weaving

    Manufacturers using modern looms weave wire mesh using a right-angled pattern. Other than that, the weaving process varies quite a bit, based on weaving pattern and crimping pattern.

    The weave in a wire cloth can be plain or twilled. In plain weave, manufacturers weave each weft wire (the wire that runs crosswise) over and under the warp wire (the wire than runs lengthwise). Alternatively, in twilled weaving, manufacturers weave the weft wire over and under two warp wires.

    Manufacturers interlock segments using any number of crimping patterns; to crimp wire is to create corrugations in the wires that secure perpendicular wires to one another. When they’re done putting the final touches on the mesh, they transport it in large rolls until an application has need for it. Then they cut off a length of it and create a wire form.

Welding

    When rigid and robust structures are needed, manufacturers electrically weld metal wires together at the intersecting points. The welding is done in such a way that the wires do not fall apart or unravel under pressure or cut.

    Manufacturers give the welded wire cloth its final shape with additional steps, like bending and cutting.

Finishing

    Wire cloth and wire screen can be finished in a variety of different ways. One of the most common ways they are finished is via galvanization. Galvanized wire mesh is further strengthened and protected against corrosion. Wire cloth made from finer weaves for screens or screen cloths may also require galvanizing to prevent the woven wires coming undone.

Design

Manufacturers decide how to design a wire cloth based on the application for which it will be used. This is because they know that the way a wire cloth is woven influences many of its characteristics, such as strength, flexibility, the total amount of open area, and mesh count (openings per inch).

In addition, they make design decisions based whether or not a metal mesh will be used for inclusion or exclusion purposes. During inclusion applications, wire cloth gives liquids or processed fluids passage, while during exclusion applications, a wire cloth restricts the passage of particles.

While manufacturers often custom weave or weld wire mesh products, they also have many weave patterns off of which they can base their work. These include those outlined below. Pre-crimped wire mesh can have one of the following weaves:

Double

    In this type of weave, each warp wire-the wire that runs vertically-passes over and under two weft wires-the wire that runs horizontally. As wire moves under and over two wires alternatively, it is called double weave.

Lock Crimp

    The crimps in wire are deep, which are used for locking the wires in place tightly. Typically, the weaving style is plain, where each warp wire moves over and under weft wire.

Flat Top

    This type of weave gives a smooth surface to wire cloth. The standard weave is used; however, the weft wire is crimped heavily, which locks the wires securely, whereas the warp wire is not crimped at all.

Intermediate Crimp

    When a wire cloth has more open area than a standard cloth, this type of weave is used. Since the space in between is larger, extra crimp is added to a wire to hold the wires together tightly and securely.

When a wire is non-crimped, it can have either of the following weaves:

Plain

    It is the simplest weave, where each warp and weft wires alternatives over and under each other; the metal screens fitted in windows and doors to keep flies away has this type of weave.

Twill

    In this type of weave, each warp wire passes over and under two weft wires. Alternatively, for a staggered configuration, a weft wire goes over and under two warp wires. Twill weave is used when the wire diameter is larger.

Plain Dutch

    It is a plain weave; the warp wire is oriented in a standard way, but the weft wire is spaced close to each other, as close as possible. The diameter of the weft and warp wire varies, typically, the warp wire has larger diameter. There is also an alternative to the plain Dutch weave, known as reverse Dutch. In this weave, the diameter of the weft and warp wire varies, typically, the warp wire has smaller diameter.

Dutch Twill

    As the name implies, this type of weave hybridizes Dutch and twill weave together. However, there is an exception; unlike twill weave, each warp wire does not alternate over and under weft wire. The resulting weave has a double layer, where weft wires are packed tightly and securely. Just like the plain Dutch weave, in this combination weave, the weft wires are thinner than the warp wires. The weave does not have openings, thus, wire cloths with this weave are for filtering of non-particulate fluids.

Manufacturers can customize wire mesh products with crimping (for added structural stability and load bearing strength), with specialty weaves, by thickness of wire (measured by mm), overall mesh sizes (measured in mm), mesh count (the number of clear openings between adjacent parallel wires per linear inch), and by material. In addition, they can add coatings. PVC coated mesh offers increased resiliency, corrosion resistance and insulation.

Machinery Used

Manufacturers weave wire using looms. They are automated and can be customized based on the following parameters: scope of weaving, scope of mesh counts, square holes range, crank shaft rotating speed, power of motor, total weight and total measurement.

In addition, some are designed for fine mesh, while others are made to weave coarse mesh. Furthermore, some are designed specifically for weaving wire mesh stainless steel.

Variations

Similar to mesh metal is perforated metal, perforated metal is sheet metal that has a pattern of holes, slots or decorative shapes. Unlike wire mesh manufacturing, which uses weaving and welding of wires to create hole patterns, perforated metal manufacturing relies on stamping machines, punch presses and lasers to mechanically stamp in the holes.

Benefits

What makes wire cloth important is its strength and accurate aperture size; these make it an appropriate material for the manufacturing of a wide range of fluid, gas, and particle cleaning equipment. Wire cloth is also versatile; it can be fabricated into a form as soft as silk or as stiff and robust as stainless steel. Wire mesh is also inexpensive and easy to customize.

Things to Consider

To find the best wire mesh product, work with an experienced wire mesh supplier. The right supplier will know the best actions to take, from whether to weld mesh or weave mesh, to what patterns to use. The right manufacturer will make sure that you get the best product possible; they will do everything they can to deliver timely, cost-effective and better than requested results. To find a manufacturer like this, browse those we have listed above. Check out their respective websites; choose three or four with whom you’d like to speak, and then reach out to them. Offer them all a detailed explanation of your application requirements; don’t forget to ask lots of questions! Then compare and contrast what they tell you. From the group, pick the one that you believe will provide you with the best customer service. Good luck!




Wire Mesh Types

  • Backing cloth is wire cloth or mesh that supports the surface of a screen.
  • Bolting cloth is a stainless steel mesh with a plain weave construction and a small wire diameter, resulting in a high percentage of open area.
  • Cloth baskets are baskets formed from wire cloth and may have a round or rectangular frame and be constructed from rod, flat or angle stock. Cloth baskets used for small parts may have a heavy screen outer lining for protection and strength.
  • Copper screens may be used for Faraday cages, electromagnetic shielding, papermaking and insect screens. Copper mesh is quite ductile and has very little springback after being bent or formed.
  • Filter cloth is cloth with differing wire diameters designed for the express purpose of filtering or straining. Filter cloth is woven in both plain and twill patterns with a higher number of wires in one direction. 
  • Galvanized wire mesh is a wire product made of interlocking metal that is coated with zinc.
  • Hardware cloth is a type of wire mesh that is welded and galvanized.
  • Metal screening is a mesh material.
  • Screen cloth is a type of wire cloth used for filtration and straining
  • Sieves are implements with mesh baskets that are used for straining.
  • Square mesh cloth is woven with uniform mesh count and wire diameter in either direction.
  • Stainless steel screens are used for sifting, especially in food service and plumbing applications where its corrosion-resistant quality is needed.
  • Stainless steel screen cloth is the most common material and has high strength and corrosion resistant properties. The mesh pattern consists of square openings. 
  • Strainers are products made from woven wire cloth that are used for clog prevention, filtering, draining, straining and sifting of liquid materials.
  • Test sieves come in a wide variety of styles, including half-height, microplate, wet washing, extra depth, air jet and grain sieves. Test sieves are totally sealed and have precision frames, structured rims and evenly tensioned mesh. 
  • Welded wire mesh is a product made from perpendicular metal wires that have been welded at their 90 degree angle cross points and are used in the construction, fencing and engineering industries.
  • Wire mesh is a material made of parallel and perpendicular interlocking metal wires which create some amount of space between where the interlocked wires cross. Wire cloth includes wires arranged in all types of weaves, including mesh weave, but mesh is characteristically not as tight as other types of non-mesh weaves (such as dutch twill), and mesh weaves with large openings (such as in wire fencing) are not considered wire cloth, but wire mesh.
  • Wire screens are are thin, finely woven metal wire mesh with a square weave that provides open yet protected barriers.
  • Woven wire mesh is the main alternative to welding and is composed of perpendicular wires that are interlaced with each other.

Wire Mesh Terms

Aperture – The space between contiguous parallel wires, expressed in millimeters.
 
Bands – Steel, galvanized steel or stainless steel material that is used to reinforce the screen edge.
 
Bend Test – A test in which wire is bent over a specified diameter through a certain angle and for a preset number of cycles, in order to determine its relative ductility, soundness and toughness.
 
Blinding – The blocking of apertures of wire mesh caused by particle entrapment of the process material.
 
Bubble Point Test – A method used to test the average aperture size. The pressure needed for air bubbles to pass through the mesh, which is covered by a test liquid, is measured, and surface tension, liquid density, temperature and immersion depth are taken into account in the calculations.
 
Calender – Also known as “rolled,” it is the process of passing wire cloth between two rollers to reduce the thickness or flatten intersections of wires and to supply a smooth surface.
 
Coin – To stamp wire cloth in order to prevent unraveling and to shape or compact the wire mesh.
 
Count – A term used only in reference to mesh wire cloth, referring to the amount of openings per linear inch as measured from the center of the wire.
 
Crimp – Corrugations in the wires for the purpose of securing the wire in place when perpendicular to each other.
 
Double Crimp – Crimping of wires prior to weaving. The shute and warp are in each crimp.
 
Feather Edges – Non-crimped, straight wire edges sticking out all around a section of screen cloth on the same plane.
 
Gauge – The diameter of the wire prior to weaving.
 
Heated Deck – A screen surface that is heated by a screen cloth, which is used as a heating element and is typically made of stainless steel material.
 
Intermediate Crimp – Shute and warp wires occurring in every other crimp.
 
Market Grades – The most commonly utilized sizes of industrial wire cloth specifications chosen for general-purpose work and typically ready for shipment upon order from companies.
 
Mesh Count – The number of openings between interlocked wires per linear inch. Mesh count indicates the size of the weave, therefore indicating filtering capabilities.
 
Offal – Excess wire screen material that, in the slitting or fabricating process, is cut from a standard roll.
 
Open Area – The proportion of open space to the total area of a wire screen, expressed as a percentage.
 
Selvage – The finishing of edges along the length of a roll of wire mesh to prevent unraveling.
 
Shute Wires – Also called “weft,” “shot,” “shoot” or “fill” wires, they are the wires going across the width of the woven cloth. Shute wires are moved back and forth by the shuttle.
 
Warp Wires – Wires going lengthwise across the wire cloth. In the weaving process called "warping the loom," the warp wires are placed first at the preferred spacing.