AGV System Manufacturers and Companies

IQS Directory is a top industrial directory listing of leading industrial AGV system manufacturers and suppliers. Access our comprehensive index to review and source AGV system manufacturers with preview ads and detailed product descriptions. These AGV system companies can design, engineer and manufacture AGV system to your specifications and application need. A quick and easy to use request for quote form is provided for you to contact these AGV system manufacturers and suppliers. Each company has detailed profile information, locations, phone number, website links, product videos and product information defined. Read customer reviews and product specific news articles. We are the right resource for your information requirement whether its for a manufacturer of AGV traffic control, AGV systems control, AGV guided systems.

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ARTICLES AND PRESS RELEASES

  • Ward Systems, Inc: Custom Automation Equipment

    AGV Systems Ward Systems, Inc. is an experienced manufacturer of AGV systems. We are an industry leader in custom manufactured automation equipment. Known for producing high quality, safe, and reliable systems, our company serves a variety of industries. Read more......

  • The Crusaders of Lean Manufacturing

    Originating from a Japanese methodology known as the Toyota Production System, lean manufacturing centers around eliminating waste. By reducing non-value-adding work, overburden and unevenness, systematic problems are exposed. Tools are adapted to different situations and only used where the ideal cannot be achieved. The main focus of lean manufacturing is to strategically place small stockpiles of inventory around the assembly line to enhance productivity on the factory floor. The system also monitors newly manufactured goods. If impurities are detected the production line stops. This allows detection and repair at the...

  • Laser Target Navigation Allows Easy Expansion of AGV System

    AGVs use a number of different navigational methods to move around the work place. The earliest AGVs followed a wire embedded in the floor. Nowadays it's becoming increasingly popular to equip AGVs with laser target navigation systems. LGV, or laser guided vehicles, are computer-controlled vehicles that are used in material handling. These vehicles navigate by using laser transmitters and receivers on a rotating turret. They are especially popular for repetitive actions or for transporting extremely heavy loads. There are two different types of lasers used for laser target navigation systems;...

  • AGV Systems: Traffic Control Methods

    I have a small addiction to flash games. These are short games that can be played directly online through the use of a flash player. One of the games I've spent a considerable amount of time playing is called Traffic Control, or something to that effect. In the world of Traffic Control I am the traffic overlord. I command a four-way stop with no traffic light. Every car blindly drives forward, so to get the cars across safely I must click on them to increase and decrease their speed. I...

  • Trust in AGV Sensors

    by Jenny Knodell, IQS Editor Automated guided vehicles have re-invented the manufacturing industry as we know it. Before 1950, all indoor vehicles used to transport loads in factories and plants were operated by workers, who were prone to human error. The first unmanned vehicle was introduced over half a century ago in the hometown of IQS Grand Rapids, Michigan. It was a tow truck that followed the path of a wire, which guided it through a manufacturing facility. Next came AGVs that followed an electromagnetic wire buried in the facility...

Industry Information

AGV Systems

The term “AGV systems” refers to automated, or automatic, guided vehicles. AGV systems run on industrial batteries or electricity to perform movement solutions within warehouses and facilities. Solutions include material handling, transportation, assembly, delivery and storage; these solutions have applications within the most industries, including: greenhouse, general manufacturing, plastics and metal, newspaper and mail, automotive, aerospace, food and beverage processing and packaging.

AGV systems have increased in popularity to the point that they now have replaced many traditional movement vehicles and solutions that require more labor, such as manually powered push carts, forklift trucks and conveyor systems. Instead of requiring constant human participation, AGV systems drive themselves, operating according to either a preprogrammed route or an internal navigation system. These two styles of navigation are called fixed path and free range systems, respectively. Fixed path systems rely on a guidance path that has been physically drawn from materials like embedded wire, magnetic tape, paint or colored tape strips. Automatic guided vehicles that follow fixed paths use antennae and frequencies to help them stay on the prescribed route. While reliable, fixed path systems are becoming less frequent because of the limit they set and the inflexibility they create. Free range systems, on the other hand, do not have this problem because the internal navigation systems of the AGVs they use alert them to expected and help them sense unexpected traffic and obstructions. Knowing what they know, these AGVs can then adjust their paths.In addition to regular autonomous guided vehicles, free range AGV systems may use laser guided vehicles. Laser guided vehicles come equipped with an infrared detection sensor, which increase their ability to sense and gauge their surroundings.

Though incredibly useful, guidance systems, especially free range systems, are complicated and require high levels of thoughtful inputting and preprogramming. Also, to ensure smooth operations, AGV systems usually require monitoring. Especially in large factories or warehouses and/or where multiple AGV systems are in used, a traffic operating systems and controller are very important components. Generally, traffic operating systems consist of locator panels, CRT display and a central logging and report center. With the help of this technology, staff can successfully monitor and track the location and movement of in-house AGV systems and gauge their efficiency, thus avoiding collisions and traffic congestion. 

Because they cater to such diverse applications, AGV systems range largely in size and capacity. They go all the way from light load automatic guided vehicles that move small parts and assist in light assembly processes, to material handling robots, vehicles that can assist with parts kitting and electronic fabrication. In between these extremes are other guided vehicles like tuggers, towing vehicles, forked AGVs, transfer cars and pallet trucks. Guided vehicles, which operate independently of human control, perform both heavy and light manufacturing processes, including tooling change, trailer loading and and finished product handling. Pallet trucks, for example, can move loads that would prove themselves to be too heavy or too bulky or inconveniently shaped for efficient manual transportation. Another guided vehicle, the automated guided cart, is capable of moving multiple ton loads at once. They are useful in aerospace applications, where they can transport heavy coils and aircraft parts with relative ease. Self propelled vehicles are another type of AGV system. Using the latest technology, self propelled vehicles can fit into small spaces, work in the same spaces as people, work in aisles and effectively adapt to changing floor conditions. 

The advantages of using AGV systems in a manufacturing plant or warehouse are manifold. First, they are efficient and dependable. They cut down on process time by eliminating stalls caused by traffic jams, collisions, human error, worker fatigue, mandatory break times and possible human injury. In addition, they are able to work faster than their human counterparts and they can work around the clock with little operator supervision. These increases in efficiency and decreases in labor costs create a productive operation flow that pays back the high initial costs of AGV systems many times over. While AGV systems are incredibly beneficial to their users, it is true that they face the potentials of system malfunction or breakdown and physical vehicle injuries caused by collision. While there is not much to be done to prevent computer problems but be diligent, there are ways to reduce harm or keep vehicles from harm altogether. To protect their investment, manufacturers may opt to have their AGV systems customized in one way or another. They may, for example, outfit them with infrared detection sensors that help them sense their surroundings and gauge their movements more accurately. Or, they may add bumpers to their bodies to create a buffer and shield them in the case of an accident. No matter their choice in this regard, manufacturers can count on an excellent investment in AGV systems.

AGV Systems
AGV Systems
AGV Systems
AGV Systems – Savant Automation, Inc.
AGV Systems – Savant Automation, Inc.
AGV Systems – Savant Automation, Inc.
AGV Systems
AGV Systems
AGV Systems
AGV Systems – Savant Automation, Inc.
AGV Systems – Savant Automation, Inc.
AGV Systems – Savant Automation, Inc.






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