EMI Enclosure Manufacturers and Suppliers

IQS Directory provides an extensive list of EMI enclosure manufacturers and suppliers. Utilize our website to review and source EMI enclosure manufacturers with our easy-to-use features which allow you to locate EMI enclosure companies that will design, engineer, and manufacture EMI enclosures for your exact specifications. Our request for quote forms make it easy to connect with leading EMI enclosure manufacturers. View company profiles, website links, locations, phone number, product videos, customer reviews, product specific news articles and other production information. We are a leading manufacturer directory who will connect you with the right manufacturers whether you are looking for polycarbonate enclosures, instrument cabinets, or NEMA enclosures.

Related Categories

More EMI Enclosures Companies Click
Industry Information

EMI Enclosures

EMI (electromagnetic interference), which is also sometimes known as RFI (radio frequency interference), is a type of disturbance caused by external forces that interfere with electrical circuits and signals. EMI enclosures, named after electromagnetic interference, are a type of housing designed specifically to insulate susceptible devices against exposure to electromagnetic fields and radiation, and the damage they can do. They can also block devices from falling victim to the coupling effect, which is when energy is transferred from one medium to another. This can happen inadvertently when products are exposed to electrostatic fields, electromagnetic radiation and radio waves. EMI enclosures block all these interferences by creating a conductive or magnetic barrier between the product and the electromagnetic interference surrounding it, which absorbs any energy of the kind that it encounters.

EMI enclosures may be built from a number of different materials. The main criteria of an EMI enclosure material is the ability to absorb magnetic energy, or high magnetic permeability. Metals such as these include aluminum, copper, nickel, steel, stainless steel and their alloys. The industry standard EMI shielding material, though, is Mu-Metal®, which is an alloy that is composed of copper, iron, molybdenum and nickel. Mu-Metal® is highly permeable and soft, with a low coercivity, which means that it saturates at low magnetic fields. Its greatest advantage over other enclosure materials is the fact that it is more ductile and workable than them. Because of this, it is more easily formed than them into the thin sheets that EMI shielding requires.

Metal EMI enclosures can be made from solid metal, but they may also be made from perforated metals, provided the perforations are closer together and smaller than the electromagnetic waves they intend to block. One of the most widely shared examples of the latter type of enclosure is the microwave door, which is covered in a perforated EMI shield. Microwave doors are also one of the few examples of EMI enclosures that are not products separate from the device they are meant to protect. Other materials from which enclosures may be made include ionized gases, metal foam and gases. In addition, manufacturers may spray an EMI shielding copper or nickel spray over a regular plastic enclosure to turn it into an EMI enclosure.

Like EMI enclosures are Faraday cages or Faraday shields, which block electromagnetic fields (EMF). Faraday cages and shields are named after the man who invented them in 1836, Michael Faraday. Faraday cages are generally formed from conductive mesh, while Faraday cages are usually made up of a continuous covering of such conductive material. They cannot only protect sensitive electronic devices from radio frequency interference (RFI), but they can also protect humans, other animals and equipment against literal electronic charges, like those emitted from lightning bolts and electrostatic discharges. Faraday cages cannot, however, provide full attenuation from EMI or RFI. Today, Faraday cages and shields are used by in microwave ovens, booster bags (shopping bags lined with aluminum foil), the scan rooms of MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) machines and by NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) and the NSA (National Security Administration) to help bring wider emission security to computers. In addition, elevators create the same environment as Faraday cages.

Electromagnetic interference can come from sources as diverse as toaster ovens, automobile ignition systems, thunderstorms, the sun, the Northern Lights, electric blankets, bluetooth devices, CRT computer monitors and baby monitors. In the most imprecise sense, EMI can come from nearly anything. Fortunately, the world of EMI enclosures is just as varied as the events and items that cause it. EMI enclosures are used to protect systems in a number of settings, including in telecommunications, healthcare, food and beverage production, and sound and stage production. Susceptible everyday items include AM radios, FM radios, televisions and cell phones. Common EMI enclosure examples include shielded cable, metallic boxes and conductive plastic boxes. Among other possible configurations, they are typically available as multi-piece enclosures, single piece enclosures and shields with removable covers. In addition, EMI can be built to fit any number of regional and/or industry standard regulations, including NEMA (National Electrical Manufacturing Association) standards, EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) standards and ISO (International Standards Organization) standards. When shopping for one or more EMI enclosures, customers have many options to fit their many needs. For quotes, answers to questions and/or consultations, interested parties should reach out to an experienced enclosure specialist today. Listed on this page are many excellent manufacturers that can address customer needs today. Learn more by contacting them.




EMI Enclosures
EMI Enclosures
EMI Enclosures
EMI Enclosures – Compac Development Corporation
EMI Enclosures – Compac Development Corporation
EMI Enclosures – Compac Development Corporation
EMI Enclosures
EMI Enclosures – Compac Development Corporation






Move to Top