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Hardness Test Services

IQS Directory provides an extensive list of hardness calibration services. Utilize our website to review and source hardness calibration services with our easy-to-use features which allow you to locate hardness calibration services that will provide hardness testing for your exact specifications. Our request for quote forms make it easy to connect with leading hardness calibration services. View company profiles, website links, locations, phone number, product videos, customer reviews, product specific news articles and other production information. We are a leading manufacturer directory who will connect you with the right service whether you are looking for mineral hardness test, rock hardness tests, or hardness tests calibrations.

  • North Haven, CT 203-484-3707

    Custom Calibration specializes in on-site and laboratory calibration which will keep costly equipment downtime to a minimum and maximize your overall productivity. We have over 30 years of experience providing calibration services for mechanical, dimensional, scale, torque, humidity, and many more applications. Our company’s mission is to achieve total customer satisfaction by providing prompt, precise, tailor-made calibration solutions to fit your specific needs.

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  • Merrillville, IN 800-373-1759

    ISO/IEC 17025:2017 & ANSI/NCSL Z540.3 Accredited Laboratory. Electronic, dimensional, physical and thermodynamic calibrations performed onsite and in our lab. Professional ASQ Certified Calibration Technicians. We support the manufacturing and service sectors including; aerospace, automotive, chemical, electronic equipment, energy, food, industrial, machinery, medical, metal, military, nuclear, pharmaceutical, plastics, and transportation. Free local pickup and delivery. In business since 1977.

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  • York, PA 717-843-0081

    Morehouse is an experienced leader in force and torque measurement helping to create a safer world. We use our knowledge to provide solutions including accurate measurement data and data analysis software. The goal is to help customers make better measurements which can make the difference between success or failure of everyday technology. We offer ISO/IEC 17025 accredited calibrations accurate to 0.002 percent of applied force up to 120,000 lbf and 0.01 percent up to 2,250,000 lbf.

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  • West Conshohocken, PA 610-825-3310

    For over 40 years, Strainsert Company has been an industry leader in manufacturing calibration services. Our goal is to provide calibrating services that are thorough and accurate, and we have experience serving a variety of applications. Our team of engineers can find a solution to your application, no matter how stringent your demands. Contact us today and let us know how we may assist you.

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  • Monterey, CA 831-373-0200

    Sierra provides accurate calibration services for mass flow meters and controllers, insertion thermal flow meters, vortex, and ultrasonic flow meters. With more than 40 years of expertise in gas, air, or liquid flow calibration, you can count on our team to make sure your flow meter operates with efficiency and pinpoint accuracy. We believe in providing personalized and customized service, and doing everything we can to maintain credibility with our clients. To get started, contact Sierra today!

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  • Grass Valley, CA 530-268-1860

    Micro Precision develops and maintains calibration services and repair services that assure levels of accuracy for your T & ME and gage blocks to high-end electronics. We also have a calibration laboratory, software and pressure calibration to meet your needs. IS0 9001:2000, ISO 17025, NIST Traceability.

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  • Ewing, NJ 888-530-9009

    The calibration program offered at Custom Calibration Solutions can save up to 40% compared to OEMs flat rates. Repairing & equipment calibration done is guaranteed. As fiber optic & RF repair experts, our resources are in-house to avoid markup costs on communications & optical equipment. Guaranteeing your instruments are within OEM specifications, our on-site team comes to your test station.

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  • More Hardness Test Companies

businessIndustry Information

Hardness Test

A hardness test is performed to determine the hardness of a material by examining how well it resists deformation. This information is beneficial because indentation hardness correlates linearly with tensile strength, which is a material’s resistance to the force that tears it apart.

Hardness tests are also frequently called indentation tests. During these tests a tool is used to force an impression on the surface of the material; generally, one material is used to scratch another material or a series of materials. These tests are mostly done on metal or stone. The results are compared and examined. Sometimes bending, scratching, cutting, abrasions or penetration is used to evaluate hardness as well. Hardness tests can be done manually by a worker using a sharp tool to gouge at the material's surface or it can be performed by a machine. Hardness cannot be automatically determined by calculating the fundamental units of mass, length and time. Instead, a hardness value is the result of a certain procedure that provides accurate responses instead of estimations. The Mohs Scale ranks materials on their ability to resist scratching by another material, one of the most common, basic and longest known techniques of taking a hardness test. The results of hardness tests are used as basis for the comparison of materials, heat treatment, quality control and more. This is necessary knowledge for industrial and manufacturing companies to determine materials and specifications for parts and products.


Hardness tests usually measure the depth or area of an indentation left by a tool of a specific shape with a certain force applied to it for a period of time. There are three main testing methods that use this basic procedure. One of the most common is the Rockwell hardness test which uses a small steel ball for soft material or a diamond cone for harder surfaces. The depth of penetration is measured automatically by the machine and displayed as a Rockwell hardness number. Another widely used method is the Brinell test. It also uses a steel ball which averages 10 millimeters in diameter. The Brinell hardness number (BHN) is closely related to the tensile strength of the material; this test, like the Rockwell, is simple, fast and does not destroy the product being tested. The Vickers test can be a microhardness test; that is, the indentations made during the testing process are so small that a microscope is required to take a measurement. On the other hand, a macroindentation can be seen with the unaided eye. The Vickers hardness test uses a triangular shaped tool to impress a pyramidal shape into the material if the metal or stone surface will allow it. Like other calibration services, hardness testing provides data and numerical discrepancies between samples; however, unlike machine or speedometer calibration the strength of the material cannot be quickly adjusted but rather must be reformulated or recreated.


Hardness Test
Hardness Test
Hardness Test - Inspec, Inc.
Hardness Test - Inspec, Inc.